How to Make a Golf Ball Barrel

by aturner

 

First off, I think the best way to make a golf ball barrel is to sleeve 1.5" SDR21 pipe into 2" sch80 pipe. However, many people have a tough time tracking down these somewhat exotic versions of PVC. An alternative is to sleeve 2" sch40 into 2"sch40, after making a lengthwise rip cut in the inner pipe.

 

I now share my experience in trying to sleeve 2" sc40 into 2" sc40 to make a GB barrel per Foxx's instructions. I snapped a few photos along the way. I'll also share a few of my own tips to help make this process go a bit smoother.

 

After measuring 7/8" and drawing guide lines on the pipe, I then used my table saw to make two cuts. I had to go back and trim just a bit more, maybe another 1/16"...

 

 

Assuming you haven't lost any fingers to the table saw, it's now time for the tough part--sleeving. After it has been cut lengthwise, the pipe will tend to pull outward, away from the gap you have cut. Following Foxx's advice, I tried to use a clamp to bring the cut edges back together. However, I observed that the pipe does not bend uniformly; the result is an oval that does not fit well into the round pipe that it is to be sleeved within....

 

 

 

For me, the use of a clamp alone did not prove useful. So I came up with a way to help keep the pipe a bit closer to the desired "round" shape....

 

 

 

I simply placed a GB in the barrel and applied the clamp, both approximately 1" from the end of the pipe. With the GB, the shape is still not a perfect circle, but it's much closer than just using the clamp alone.

 

The two edges will still try to pull away a little, so you'll need to counteract this a bit more. One thing that seemed to help with this was to position the clamp so that it pushed one edge of the lengthwise cut downward. Then, when you attempt to get the sleeve started, press the other edge against the outer barrel, in order to hold it down.

 

Just getting the sleeve started can be a challenge, but I got better with practice. Here's a shot of the sleeve just beginning....

 

 

From that point I removed the GB to prevent any sort of a jam, and then carefully repositioned the clamp a couple of inches up the pipe....

 

 

To continue the sleeving, I placed the inner sleeve against a wall (padded with some scraps of carpet) and then used a rubber mallet to bang the other end of the outer sleeve pipe. After I got about 4 to 6 inches of the inner sleeve in place, then the edges pulled together much better...

 

 

Now that I had a good start, I realized the rubber mallet was a great way to get the sleeve started for the first 8 to 10 inches, but it was slow and tedious. So I just had to figure out how to move the rest of the sleeve into place at a faster pace. For this, I placed a few scraps of carpet on my concrete driveway, turned the pipe verticaly with the outer sleeve downward, held the inner sleeve in my hands (with thick work gloves), and banged the pipe downward on the carpeted area. Just so I could tell that I was making progress, I occasionally drew a few pencil lines on the inner sleeve pipe, and watched them disappear into the outer pipe as I worked. Here's the finished product....

 

 

Using these methods, I have been able to sleeve a 4 ft and a 6ft barrel. I can say that this sleeving approach takes time and it is physically demanding.

 

And to quote Chewy, "if all else fails resort to brute force and awkwardness if it don't fit force it".

 

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